Monday, May 05, 2008

Citizens Air Radio Ads Supporting Wind Power

Those who are tired of Delmarva Power's endless ad campaign will be interested in this release which was circulated today:
For immediate release
May 5, 2008
Contact:
Nick DiPasquale, Conservation Chair, Delaware Audubon
Tom Noyes

Citizens Release Radio Ads Supporting Wind Power

A group of citizen activists is running radio ads challenging Delmarva Power’s assertion that offshore wind would cost customers 30 to 40 percent more on their electric bills.
The ads are paid for by voluntary donations collected by Delaware Audubon.
Nick DiPasquale, Conservation Chair for Delaware Audubon, said, “Delmarva Power has spent thousands of dollars on ads claiming offshore wind power would raise rates 30 to 40 percent. We wanted to correct the record.”
Tom Noyes said, “The Public Service Commission (PSC) projects that the Bluewater Wind power purchase agreement would cost the average customer $6.46 a month—less than five percent. But even that estimate is based on Delmarva Power’s mistaken assertion that natural gas prices will go down instead of up. Citizens understand that offshore wind power in Delaware will provide a measure of price stability in the face of rising fossil fuel prices.”

Nick DiPasquale said, “This debate should be based on agreed-upon facts. If Delmarva fails to explain why its numbers differ so dramatically from those of the Public Service Commission, it should pull its misleading ads.”
Two similar 30 second radio ads are being aired:
Version 1 (Male voice)
Delmarva Power claims offshore wind energy would raise our electric rates 30 to 40 percent. But the Public Service Commission says it would be no more than 5 percent—and that's only if fossil fuel prices go down instead of up. Instead coal and natural gas are climbing sky-high.
Call your state senator to say we want them to choose offshore wind power based on the facts—not Delmarva Power's scare tactics.
Paid for by individual citizens through Delaware Audubon.
Version 2 (Female voice)
Delmarva Power claims offshore wind energy would raise electric rates 30 to 40 percent.
But the Public Service Commission and independent experts say rates would rise no more than 5 percent—and that's based on Delmarva's assumption that fossil fuel prices will drop. Assume that fossil fuel prices will drop? Fuel prices are going through the roof!
Call your state senator to say we want them to choose offshore wind power based on the facts—and not buckle under to Delmarva Power's scare tactics.
Paid for by individual citizens through Delaware Audubon.
The ads began running on WDEL, 1150 AM, on Monday, May 5.
-End-

Delmarva Power's total advertising budget is probably 100 times the cost of this modest buy. But at least listeners will hear a message challenging the company's assertions.

3 Comments:

Anonymous Nick said...

That's funny that all three of those ads focus on the point that you keep reiterating. It seems like it's resonating with people.

6:28 PM, May 05, 2008  
Anonymous kavips said...

I heard Delmarva's newest ad today around three. For the uninitiated, it may sound scary: 30 to 40 percent? ( I heard yours around 3:45 and said to myself: wow, that was fast....)

For anyone who gets a chance to corner one of their representatives outside Legislative Hall or public meeting...ask them in public, to explain how, if Bluewater Wind is so expensive, how come they are currently charging us a price higher than that of Bluewater's?

Obviously they are not telling us the truth somewhere.........

For if Bluewater's price is so high, and Delmarva is charging us even higher, obviously we should try not to get our power from Delmarva, now shouldn't we?

3:26 AM, May 06, 2008  
Anonymous Edmund Dohnert said...

I glad to see that the absurd assumption about natural gas prices going down instead of up is getting the public criticism it strongly deserves.

If Delmarva really believes that the price of natural gas will drop, then why doesn't it commit right now to freezing electric rates for the same period of time that these prices are supposedly going to drop?

And if Harris McDowell really believes that the price of natural gas will drop, then why doesn't he take a substantial amount of his own money, go to the futures market, and take out a short position on natural gas futures, thereby betting on lower gas prices?

As I've said before, any cost projection that goes 25 years out is pure fiction and not to be taken seriously. That fact alone should be good enough reason to value the cost stability that a wind farm would provide.

11:38 AM, May 06, 2008  

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