Tuesday, September 06, 2005

"A biological weapon called standing water"

No one in television news delivers invective with as much verve and style as Keith Olbermann. Last night he lit into President Sluggo and company:
Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff said it all, starting his news briefing Saturday afternoon: "Louisiana is a city that is largely underwater..."
Well there's your problem right there.
If ever a slip-of-the-tongue defined a government's response to a crisis, this was it.
Olbermann points out, none too gently, that keeping us safe from harm is the reason these people gave us for keeping them in power:
But, nationally, these are leaders who won re-election last year largely by portraying their opponents as incapable of keeping the country safe. These are leaders who regularly pressure the news media in this country to report the reopening of a school or a power station in Iraq, and defies its citizens not to stand up and cheer. Yet they couldn't even keep one school or power station from being devastated by infrastructure collapse in New Orleans — even though the government had heard all the "chatter" from the scientists and city planners and hurricane centers and some group whose purposes the government couldn't quite discern... a group called The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
And most chillingly of all, this is the Law and Order and Terror government. It promised protection — or at least amelioration — against all threats: conventional, radiological, or biological.
It has just proved that it cannot save its citizens from a biological weapon called standing water.
Mr. Bush has now twice insisted that, "we are not satisfied," with the response to the manifold tragedies along the Gulf Coast. I wonder which "we" he thinks he's speaking for on this point. Perhaps it's the administration, although we still don't know where some of them are. Anybody seen the Vice President lately? The man whose message this time last year was, 'I'll Protect You, The Other Guy Will Let You Die'?
And as for the the excuses offered for the government's failure to act decisively:
Instead of hiding behind phrases like "no one could have foreseen," had he only remembered Winston Churchill's quote from the 1930's. "The responsibility," of government, Churchill told the British Parliament "for the public safety is absolute and requires no mandate. It is in fact, the prime object for which governments come into existence."
You can read the whole thing at Bloggermann and watch the video at CanOFun Political Videos.

1 Comments:

Blogger Jason said...

Olberman is great. This quote hits the nail on the head:

"The responsibility," of government, Churchill told the British Parliament "for the public safety is absolute and requires no mandate. It is in fact, the prime object for which governments come into existence."

The fact that Bush keeps a bust of Churchill in the oval office and considers himself a sort of modern day Churchill would be funny if Bush were not so lethaly incompetent.

10:32 AM, September 06, 2005  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home